Sad Fantasies

“Our society is dedicated almost entirely to the celebration of ego, with all its sad fantasies about success and power, and it celebrates those very forces of greed and ignorance that are destroying the planet.” ~Sogyal Rinpoche

Advertisements

“It holds the water admirably.”

“Do you see this glass? I love this glass. It holds the water admirably. When the sun shines on it, it reflects the light beautifully. When I tap it, it has a lovely ring. Yet for me, this glass is already broken. When the wind knocks it over or my elbow knocks it off the shelf and it falls to the ground and shatters, I say, ‘Of course.’ But when I understand that this glass is already broken, every minute with it is precious.”  ~Ajahn Chah

Bodhisattva

“A Bodhisattva is one who comes back and appears in the everyday world, and plays the game of the everyday world, by the rules of the everyday world.  But he brings with him upaya.  He bring with him some way of showing that he’s been on the journey, that he’s come back, and he’s going to let you in on the secret too.”  ~Alan Watts, Turning the Head or Turning On

It would be a mistake to assume bodhisattvas only arrive in lotus-sitting robe-wearing form.  A bodhisattva could reach a lot more people by, for example, carrying a guitar.

Habits 2

“We drink a cup of tea, but we do not know we are drinking a cup of tea. We sit with the person we love, but we don’t know that she is there. We walk, but we are not really walking. We are someplace else, thinking about the past or the future. The horse of our habit energy is carrying us along, and we are its captive. We need to stop our horse and reclaim our liberty. We need to shine the light of mindfulness on everything we do, so the darkness of forgetfulness will disappear.”  ~Thich Nhat Hanh

Hooks

Excerpted from the article “5 Ways Not to Bite the Trump Hook” by Susan Piver, in the March 2017 issue of Lion’s Roar:

Pema Chodron famously introduced us to the notion of shenpa, which she defines as “biting the hook” of our habitual reactions.

When someone leaves us, we may bite the hook of grasping.  When something unfair happens, we may bite the hook of rage.  When we are disappointed, we may bite the hook of numbness.

What would it look like in your life not to bite the hook?