Christmas Music

SomaFM has some fun, commercial-free Christmas stations this time of year.  Click HERE to listen.

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Dystopia

Excerpted from The Guardian’s article, ‘Our minds can be hijacked’: the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia :

“The technologies we use have turned into compulsions, if not full-fledged addictions,” (Nir) Eyal writes. “It’s the impulse to check a message notification. It’s the pull to visit YouTube, Facebook, or Twitter for just a few minutes, only to find yourself still tapping and scrolling an hour later.” None of this is an accident, he writes. It is all “just as their designers intended”.

Read the entire article HERE.

Charm

The BBC recently posted an article on the science of being charming.  Here, in summary, is how you do it:

  1. Smile
  2. Arch your eyebrows
  3. Mirror other’s body language
  4. Feign interest in their lives

Maybe it’s an English thing, but it was interesting to me that they just assume you’ll have to pretend to be interested in other people.  The article even includes several tips to help you pull it off.

Read the entire article at BBC.com

Compassion

Actor/author Wil Wheaton went through a recent health scare with his wife that required multiple trips to the emergency room.  This is the part of his story that resonated with me, because I realized that in all of the times I’ve been to the hospital with my Mona, we’ve never heard these words:

“That isn’t normal for a kidney stone or constipation,” the doctor says. “I’m going to get you an ultrasound, and some more pain medication.” Then, she does something I realize that the two other doctors we’ve seen since this all started didn’t do: she takes a moment and says, “I’m so sorry that you’re in so much pain, and I’m sorry that hurt so much. We’re going to figure out what’s going on with you, and I won’t send you home until we do.”

Read the whole account at WilWheaton.net.

Ashtavakra Gita

I’ve been reading the Ashtavakra Gita a lot lately.  It’s one of the more accessible Hindu holy texts, and a nice translation by John Richards has been released to the public domain and is available from WikiSource, HERE.

Be sure to note that the sidebar on the left has many download options available, including PDF and various formats compatible with E-Books.